Portfolio

What were some of the highlights, surprises and/or challenges you encountered as a researcher and a writer? Why might these experiences be important to your development as a research writer? Provide specific examples.

In this class, I was challenged, in a great way, by all of the different types of writing we had to do. I had to write things for this class that I would have never thought about writing, such as our interviews and reviews. I think these experiences were important to my development as a research writer because I learned about the creation process of these genres of writing. For example, I had never really even thought about how much research an interviewer would have to do before interviewing their subject. I found that I went very in depth about the background of my interview topic before I went into the interview, because I didn’t want to waste the time of my interviewee by making them answer easy questions that I should have looked up before going into the interview. That is just one example of how I have developed as a research writer.

 

 

Reflect on the topic of inquiry: Encountering Art. How did research and writing impact your engagement, interest or understanding as you worked within the arts inquiry?

I am usually pretty surrounded by art on a daily basis. I came into the course thinking that I wouldn’t really learn a whole lot about the art that I encounter, but I now know that this is false. The projects that we did, such as the reviews, really made me think in a different way about the art I was seeing. The review for example, I had to think about describing my own personal experiences to an outside audience, but not relate it back to myself a lot, which was something challenging to me, but I enjoyed thinking about the art I was coming in contact with in a different way than I had ever thought about it before.

 

 

Which of your projects do you most hope others will read and be influenced by? Why? Which of the secondary sources (shared readings, researched materials) or primary sources (interview, arts encounters, observations) were most influential or important to you and your work as a research writer? Why?

I hope that people will be influenced by my controversy guide. I had noticed that when I had brought up my topic in class, not too many people knew too much about it, and I feel as though that my topic has a deep underlying lesson that will be relevant in the world now and for years to come. I also hope that people will just learn something new from my guide. Going along the lines of my guide, I think that the secondary source that was most influential to me was the Dismaland video. I always knew that there were people who did and didn’t like certain art, but this really opened up my eyes to how influential art can really be and I think that this will stick with me for a long time.

 

How do the practices for research and research writing we have been doing this semester contrast or relate to other research work you are encountering or may encounter in the future (think across contexts–school, professional or personal research and writing)? Are there practices, learning or ideas from WRT 205 that you believe may be useful in current or future research writing situations? Have you developed any new understanding about the differences among and between research writing situations? Try to be as specific as possible. Include examples.

I think that the reviews will be the most helpful to me. I believe that in my life I will be having to describe lots of performances and shows, so getting a good base on how to create a good, solid review will be the most beneficial to me. I feel that I have gotten a new understanding and appreciation for how much work really goes into different writing situations. The one that surprised me the most, like mentioned earlier, was the interview. It is so much more than preparing questions and asking them, and that project really opened my eyes up to that.

 

 

Featured Summary Heuristic

The summary heuristic I chose to feature from this semester was my summary heuristic on Teju Cole’s, “A True Picture of Black Skin.” The reason why I chose this heuristic is because I felt like when I was filling out the heuristic, I was learning more and more about the author’s piece. I usually found myself learning new things will filling out the heuristics, but I really got into this one. I found the topic so interesting and it was something I had never thought about, so I was learning about a new issue while also furthering my skills of summarizing pieces. I also chose this because while my summary is succinct, the information provided packs a punch and it is very informative.

 

 

Click here for the Revised Unit 3 Project

 

Some more work I was proud of this semester! 

Arts Encounter #2

 

Before the event: The event that I chose to attend was a senior recital at the Setnor school of music. The recital was done by a mezzo-soprano singer. I wasn’t quite sure what it meant to be a mezzo-soprano, and I found out that it is the voice of a female singer in between soprano and alto, and it is known as a “half soprano” voice type. Unfortunately, the program is not released until about 20 minutes before the performance so I was not able to look into the songs being performed, but I did just listen to some classical voice pieces before I went to the recital, and something that I always forget that is very interesting about singing is that singers have to learn to sing in many different languages even though they may only speak just one.

 

During the event:  When I walked into the auditorium, I had taken a packet along with a program. The packet contained translations of all of the songs that were not sung in English. I found this to be a very important aspect of the performance. While the singer had a wonderful voice, it would have been very hard to get the same experience without knowing what she was singing about. Usually when I go to musical performances of classical music, the audience is usually quite serious and intent on listening very carefully. I found this recital to be a bit different from that. The lyrics to some of the songs that were sung were very humorous and silly, and the singer delivered them with perfect facial expression and body language, so even though the words were being sung in a different language, it was very relevant to know when something was funny, or when something became very solemn and quiet in the lyrics. The last song that she sang was my favorite song. It was very beautiful, and it was a slow song that had a light and flowing. When I first heard the chords in the piano, it had sounded like music that originated in Asia. After the song ended there was a brief pause of silence and it really added to the experience of the song. After the recital ended, I had found out that the last song was written by the singer’s mother just for this recital. Her mother is from Korea and has been a composer for almost all of her life.

 

Questions: One question that I really thought about especially at intermission, was how do singers go about selecting their repertoire for concerts and recitals? I felt the songs at this recital went very well together and I am wondering if it just happened to work out very well, or if there was a method to the madness of song selection. Another question I was thinking about all throughout the performance was how do singers learn how to pronounce so many words in different languages without knowing how to speak it? It is quite impressive.

 

 

Writing Presentation:

“Selfie” Heuristic

 

Background/Context of Guide and Writer: Though this event happened 2 years ago, the principle of what happened is still very relevant in today’s issues. I, the writer, had heard about what happened during this attack and was never really quite sure what “side to take” so I still remain somewhat neutral to this tragedy/controversy.

 

Genre: A newcomer’s guide to the Charlie Hebdo attack. In this guide I plan to explain the magazine and what they represent, as well as some background on the religion of Islam

 

Aims/Methods/Materials: In this guide I plan to explain the magazine and what they represent, as well as some background on the religion of Islam. I feel as though if the reader understands what both sides of this controversy believe in, they will be able to get a better understanding of why everything happened the way that it did two years ago.

 

 

Flashpoints & Keywords/Concepts: Points of the controversy

-Not depicting the prophet

-Freedom of speech

-Where do we draw the line?

 

Audience: The general public – anybody interested in learning about how art can shape or break a society

 

Two Sentence Summary: In this guide, I hope to give the reader an overview of the people and societies involved in this attack, and why this event is important to art and our rights. The attack is something that we can learn from today and I believe it is important to understand it.

 

Video to explain controversy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6hU3nhudRg&t=117s

Some Background on Islam:

http://www.cnn.com/2015/05/04/living/islam-prophet-images/

 

 

History with a Small “h” summary heuristic

Background/Context: Rachel Middleman is the assistant professor of Art History at California State University, Chico. She teaches courses on modern, contemporary, and American art history.

Genre: Arts Interview

 

Aims/Methods/Materials: The purpose of this interview (Q&A) is to get the artist to explain the reactions he is trying to arise from the art viewer, since the artists art comes off as very simple and “everyday” but there is quite a twist on it.

 

Flashpoints/Keywords: “I wanted people to think about uses of public spaces, particularly queer uses of public spaces, because there was some cruising going on in the downtown area.”

 

“…it’s about memorializing a moment, but it doesn’t memorialize the before and after.”

 

Audience: Art enthusiasts, members of the LGBT community, townsfolk

 

Two Sentence Summary: Glenn Ligon has created plaques placed around San Antonio, Texas that explain “cruising” encounters and experiences. In this interview, the artist elaborates on what inspired him to make these plaques, and what reactions he was trying to get from the public, versus the messages he was trying to send out.

 

 

Arts Controversy Guide

The attack on the Charlie Hebdo magazine headquarters took place on Wednesday, January 7th, 2015 in Paris, France. Charlie Hebdo is a French satirical news magazine that started in 1970. The magazine is most well known for their cartoons.

 

This cartoon reads “The invention of Humor: Oil and Fire”
This reads “Predictions of the Mage Houellebecq: ‘In 2015, I lose my teeth…In 2022, I observe Ramadan!'”

 

Many of the magazine’s cartoons were on edge with somewhat sensitive topics, including religion and race. The magazine describes itself as “…an angry magazine, a paper that takes the piss. It’s a weekly with a wallop, a digest with a dream. It’s a periodical that argues and a journal that thinks. It’s a gazette of the grotesque – because that’s what so much of life and politics is.” As you can see from the images above, the magazine doesn’t hold back from expressing their opinions in a pretty crude way.  While some people may find this disrespectful, the magazine has a right to publish and speak their minds.

 

The attack was done by two brothers, Saïd and Chérif Kouachi. The two made their way into the magazine’s headquarters armed with assault rifles. They killed 12 people and injured 11. Why were they the ones to attack? They later came out as belonging to a branch of Al-Qaeda which was located in Yemen.

 

Al-Qaeda’s flag

 

Al-Qaeda is a militant Sunni Islamist organization. Many of the people who are involved with this organization are extremely passionate about Islam. Islam is a monotheistic religion that states there is only one God, and that the prophet Muhammad is the last messenger of god. Islam’s religious text, the Qur’an, does not specifically state that depictions of the prophet are forbidden, but the notion that there is only one God is why depictions of the prophet are very frowned upon. There is a fear that the depiction of Muhammad could lead to idol worship. When the brothers attacked the headquarters, they yelled “We have avenged the Prophet!”

 

A still photo from a witness’ video of the two brothers exclaiming “We have avenged the Prophet!”

 

 

After hearing this, it might be quite evident as to why the gunmen decided to attack the magazine headquarters filled with rage. This attack was not something that happened over a short period of time. Islamic organizations began getting angry at Charlie Hebdo in 2006 and eventually, unsuccessfully, sued the magazine with the French hate speech laws. Again in 2011, problems occurred when the magazine released an issue that was “guest edited by Muhammad.” The front cover had a cartoon that depicted Muhammad saying “100 lashes, if you don’t die laughing!”

After the publication of that cover, the magazine’s office was firebombed, and their website was hacked. On the hacked website it read “You keep abusing Islam’s almighty Prophet with disgusting and disgraceful cartoons using excuses of freedom of speech… Be God’s curse on you! We will be your curse on cyber world!”

This is what the hacked webpage looked like. Click on the photo to learn more.

 

The magazine came back with a new magazine cover that read “Love Stronger Than Hate” and it depicted the Prophet Muhammad as gay, by showing him kissing an editor of Charlie Hebdo.

All of these magazine cartoons fed the soon to be lit fire under angry Islamists. The two brothers were the ones who finally decided to take their anger in the form of violence to the headquarters of the magazine. The reason why this entire controversy is so important, is because it is very much about freedom of speech, and art censorship. Because although these cartoons were found very offensive to many, it was still the opinions and ideas of the magazine writers and publishers. So the question that this tragic event brings forward is, where is the line between artistic freedom and outright hatred. This is an important idea to keep in mind in today’s world especially with topics of race and religion being even more tense than ever before.

 

The magazine’s cover after the attack on their headquarters. Click on the photo to see more.

Controversy Presentation

“Selfie” Heuristic

 

Background/Context of Guide and Writer: Though this event happened 2 years ago, the principle of what happened is still very relevant in today’s issues. I, the writer, had heard about what happened during this attack and was never really quite sure what “side to take” so I still remain somewhat neutral to this tragedy/controversy.

 

Genre: A newcomer’s guide to the Charlie Hebdo attack. In this guide I plan to explain the magazine and what they represent, as well as some background on the religion of Islam

 

Aims/Methods/Materials: In this guide I plan to explain the magazine and what they represent, as well as some background on the religion of Islam. I feel as though if the reader understands what both sides of this controversy believe in, they will be able to get a better understanding of why everything happened the way that it did two years ago.

 

 

Flashpoints & Keywords/Concepts: Points of the controversy

-Not depicting the prophet

-Freedom of speech

-Where do we draw the line?

 

Audience: The general public – anybody interested in learning about how art can shape or break a society

 

Two Sentence Summary: In this guide, I hope to give the reader an overview of the people and societies involved in this attack, and why this event is important to art and our rights. The attack is something that we can learn from today and I believe it is important to understand it.

 

 

Some background on Islam and its beliefs:

http://www.cnn.com/2015/05/04/living/islam-prophet-images/

Some more Charlie Hebdo Covers

The cover of Charlie Hebdo after the attack

Arts Review – Wicked

On March 25th, I saw the Broadway musical Wicked at the Landmark theater in Syracuse. People were packed into the theater like sardines in a can. The production was only in Syracuse for 12 days, so many scrambled to get tickets.

The show was a really cool twist on the classic good versus evil storyline. Not only was it that, but it was not only just an interesting take on a typical storyline, the entire story of Glinda and Elphaba was a prequel, if you will, to The Wizard of Oz which adds a completely new layer to this story. All throughout the play, there are quotes and scenes that allude to the creation of the plotline for The Wizard Of Oz and they are all quite clever, and for the most part make sense. The play takes place in the same setting as The Wizard of Oz, but just at different times. The pair of witches spend a lot of time in the Emerald city during the story. The costumes as well as the scenery for the emerald city are all undeniably emerald. The light up archway to the emerald city is so green and bright, when it comes on to the audience entire theater glows an emerald glow. The townsfolk were also green from head to toe in costumes that were as crazy as the idea of a real wizard. Their hats curled in ways that seemed to defy gravity, and their coats and pants looked like they were designed by a group of young children, but in the best way possible. Throughout the many set changes from school, to ballroom, to emerald city, one piece of the set seemed to stay put. A big clock always remained in the scene. This was to represent how important time was in the story. Time was of the essence in most of the scenes in this musical. Time was also a theme in many of the songs that were sung, including “Dancing through Life” and the emotional duet between the two witches, “For Good.” The musical tells a story of how time may go on, and some people change and some stay the same. Both characters change in very different ways.

There were a couple of places where the plot left me puzzled. For instance, one of the main reasons why Elphaba begins this journey to the Wizard is because she is frustrated with how the animals are being treated in Oz. She tells the Wizard what she is thinking, and he doesn’t feel the same way, and Elphaba takes matter into her own hands. She runs off with the Wizard’s spell book and hides away in Oz, hoping she can make things better for the animals herself. She later finds herself back with the Wizard who still is longing for Elphaba’s help in the kingdom. She still refuses. Then the Wizard offers to let the monkeys she accidentally cursed go if she decides to help him. She willingly accepts this compromise, and that is kind of all we hear of the animal controversy in Oz. What I didn’t understand was, if the entire reason why Elphaba began this journey was to help the animals gain equality in society in Oz, why was she just so willing to just let go of what she has been fighting for for the entire story right then and there. This confused me especially because after this moment in the show, there is not much other talk about the inequality in society that the animals have, and that was something that was in the back of my mind while watching this.

The production overall was spectacular. Despite the one plot aspect that was a little confusing, the entirety of the show was extremely well done. The songs were very clever and catchy, and the sets and costumes were breathtaking.

Review Rough Draft

This past weekend, I saw the Broadway musical Wicked at the Landmark theater in Syracuse. People were packed into the theater like sardines in a can. The production was only in Syracuse for 12 days, so many scrambled to get tickets.

The show was a really cool twist on the classic good versus evil storyline. Not only was it that, but it was not only just an interesting take on a typical storyline, the entire story of Glinda and Elphaba was a prequel, if you will, to The Wizard Of Oz which adds a completely new layer to this story. All throughout the play, there are quotes and scenes that allude to the creation of the plotline for The Wizard Of Oz and they are all quite clever, and for the most part make sense. The play takes place in the same setting as The Wizard Of Oz, but just at different times. The pair of witches spend a lot of time in the Emerald city during the story. The costumes as well as the scenery for the emerald city are all undeniably emerald. The light up archway to the emerald city is so green and bright, when it comes on to the audience entire theater glows an emerald glow. The townsfolk were also green from head to toe in costumes that were as crazy as the idea of a real wizard. Their hats curled in ways that seemed to defy gravity, and their coats and pants looked like they were designed by a group of young children, but in the best way possible. Throughout the many set changes from school, to ballroom, to emerald city, one piece of the set seemed to stay put. A big clock always remained in the scene. This was to represent how important time was in the story. Time was of the essence in most of the scenes in this musical. Time was also a theme in many of the songs that were sung, including “Dancing through Life” and the emotional duet between the two witches, “For Good.” The musical tells a story of how time may go on, and some people change and some stay the same.

Arts Encounter #4

Before the event: This performance of Wicked was done by Broadway on tour. Wicked is the story of how the two witches of Oz came to be who they are, and the stories they each have to tell, and the lessons that they learned. I did just a little bit of research on the plot line because I had seen this musical once before when I was very young, and I didn’t really remember much of what I had seen.

 

During the event:

The show was absolutely spectacular. I saw the show in downtown Syracuse at the Landmark Theater on Saturday night, the 25th. The singers’ voices rang throughout the theater when they were singing and it really resonated in my mind. The set changes were very cool as well. It seemed that a lot of the changes happened right there on stage when things were still happening, and people were still singing. This was very cool because even though the change was happening in plain sight, you are not really focused on it and you are still focused on what is happening between the actors and actresses on stage, so then the action ends, and the scene is new. The voices of Glinda and Elphaba were so amazing. They blended so well together when they sang harmonies, and when they sang in unison, they sounded like one singer. The effects and lighting in this show were also breathtaking. There were times when we were in the emerald city, and these green lights came on and the entire theater lit up in very bright green. The costumes also were very intricate. The ensemble’s costumes always matched what was going on but in such a goofy and obscure way, and it was very interesting to see them emerge from the wings of the stage when the time period was changing in the show, because then they would come out in completely different outfits.

 

Some questions I had:

How do Broadway performers perform so well for so many nights in a row?

How do traveling Broadway take all of their set parts with them when they travel?

How long do the actors and actresses rehearse every day?

 

 

Mentor Reviewers

Mentor Reviewers: Anthony Lane

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/06/get-out-and-logan

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/13/kong-skull-island-and-raw

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/21/nocturnal-animals-and-elle

 

Anthony Lane has been writing film reviews for The New Yorker for 24 years. I enjoyed his reviews that I read. To me, they had a very laid back style, while still using very good descriptive language to summarize the movie while still keeping the review critical. Some of the other reviews I had just kind of reminded me of summaries of a movie, but Lane provides a lot of analysis which gives the audience a further understanding of the movie and its messages. I really enjoyed Lane’s review of “Get Out.” He goes into describe how this movie is very hard to correctly place into one genre, because of how “all over the place” this movie is. His style of analysis is very casual, and he asks a lot of hypothetical questions that really got me thinking, and that is something I liked about his style of review.

Arts Interview

Singing From a Perspective Across 5 Octaves

 

What lead you to sing?

I played the piano for a while, and after, I played violin. I got bored, so I started singing. And now, I go to school for singing. I like it more than the other instruments.

 

What is your favorite thing about singing?

My favorite thing about singing is that it brings people together. And riffing.

 

 

These are just some simple questions I asked to get the ball rolling for Nicholas Peta, a freshman music education major here at Syracuse University. Nick is not just another vocal student. He is one of just two countertenors here at the Setnor School of Music. What is a countertenor you may ask? I think Clemency Burton-Hill from BBC says it best when she describes listening to a countertenor: “At first, you can scarcely believe your ears, so arresting is the sound a countertenor makes.” A countertenor is the highest male singing voice that there is. So while they can still hit notes that regular male tenors can hit, they can also extend their range to hit notes that altos and even sopranos can hit. This makes for a very wide range of possibilities for a countertenor. For Nick, discovering this untapped upper register of his was not something that was very hard for him to find out, so I asked him:

 

 

When did you first discover your ability to sing in the upper register?

When I listened to listened to ‘All I Want for Christmas is You’ by Mariah Carey, I really wanted to sing her part and I started to try to in 8th grade. Then, I started to perform music in a barbershop quartet and those parts required me to sing higher notes.

 

 

What has it been like becoming a countertenor?

“It has been really hard, and it made me feel really insecure. But that is just what comes with doing something very new. Also, it’s just fun! It’s fun to sing with female singers, it is quite a different experience.”

 

 

Nick did not start to really learn how to use his high register until he came here to Syracuse when his voice teacher threw the idea of becoming a countertenor on him. The history of male singers with high voices is not the prettiest. Going back to Clemency Burton-Hill’s BBC article, she goes into some detail about how countertenor’s work today would have been sung by a male “castrato.” It can be easy to see now how tackling songs meant for a castrato might be a little bit demeaning, and might make somebody like Nick who is relatively new at the whole countertenor thing, a bit insecure. But, Burton-Hill doesn’t just talk about the kind of uncomfortable history of countertenors, she also talks about what countertenors are doing today. She talks about how there are many opportunities for countertenors in church music, as well as many great operas. So even though it sounds like countertenors could be perceived as a dying art because of the practices that no longer go on, people like myself and Burton-Hill want to assure people that this is not a dead art form. I went on to ask Nick some final questions about his countertenor career.

 

 

What are some of the struggles being a countertenor?

Not knowing how to do anything. Finding repertoire, because not a lot of people sing countertenor – binary rep. Having old people in “Oratorio” tell me I’m in the wrong section. Sounding like a balloon… I don’t want to sound like a balloon. That’s been a challenge.

 

How do other people react to hearing your voice?

Either they run away or they clap their hands.

 

What’s something you see in your future as a countertenor?

I look forward to be able to singing every voice part when I’m teaching students so they can have somebody who can really show them how it’s done rather than just telling them how to do it.

 

 

 

So, even though Nick is not thinking along Burton-Hill’s path of church gigs and opera performances, he is still going to use his great vocal range to his students’ advantage. This is actually something really great, because it is another application of a countertenor’s ability used in a way that will benefit others. The art of countertenors is not one that is going to die out, thanks to people like Nick and many other great singers.

Arts Encounter #3

Before the event: I found out that my local art museum was showing an exhibit of Matisse drawings and I was interested to see what they were like. I did not know much about Matisse before I decided to go so I found out some basic information about him. He was a French artist. He was one of the leaders of the movement of Fauvism. One of his most famous paintings is Woman with a Hat which he painted in 1905. He also does work with sculptures.

 

During the event: I went on a weekday afternoon, so there was nobody else in the entire museum and it was a very cool feeling. It was silent, and I was able to take my time looking at each drawing and sketch. The sketches were all lined up in the 2 exhibit rooms in a figure 8 motion. When I walked into the museum, I was handed a pamphlet and told just that, that the sketches are arranged in a figure 8 and that’s how I would have to walk to follow along with the pamphlet. The exhibit was very cool, and because it was so quiet in the museum it really added another layer of “intensity” to the art. All of the sketches were done with almost the exact same materials. All of the sketches were either done in pencil, ink, or charcoal on paper. All of the titles of the pieces were very literal, such as “Woman in a chair” or “Large Self-Portrait” which I thought was interesting. I found this exhibit really interesting because to me, it seemed like a behind the scenes look at what artists go through while trying to create. These sketches are just sketches, but they are still very interesting to me. They might not have been very interesting to Matisse at the time, but they now give the public a sort of insight to what he was inspired by and what he was interested in, aside from his more well-known pieces of art.

 

This is the pamphlet I was given upon entering the museum

 

Questions: The entire time I was walking around this exhibit, I was wondering to myself, how were these sketches obtained? Were these hidden away somewhere in Matisse’s old works and supplies, or were these sketches put aside for them to be displayed just as they are being displayed now? I was also wondering on why he decided to be so literal with the naming of his sketches. Was that intentional by keeping short a brief, or was that a stylistic choice?

Arts Encounter #2

Before the event: The event that I chose to attend was a senior recital at the Setnor school of music. The recital was done by a mezzo-soprano singer. I wasn’t quite sure what it meant to be a mezzo-soprano, and I found out that it is the voice of a female singer in between soprano and alto, and it is known as a “half soprano” voice type. Unfortunately, the program is not released until about 20 minutes before the performance so I was not able to look into the songs being performed, but I did just listen to some classical voice pieces before I went to the recital, and something that I always forget that is very interesting about singing is that singers have to learn to sing in many different languages even though they may only speak just one.

 

During the event:  When I walked into the auditorium, I had taken a packet along with a program. The packet contained translations of all of the songs that were not sung in English. I found this to be a very important aspect of the performance. While the singer had a wonderful voice, it would have been very hard to get the same experience without knowing what she was singing about. Usually when I go to musical performances of classical music, the audience is usually quite serious and intent on listening very carefully. I found this recital to be a bit different from that. The lyrics to some of the songs that were sung were very humorous and silly, and the singer delivered them with perfect facial expression and body language, so even though the words were being sung in a different language, it was very relevant to know when something was funny, or when something became very solemn and quiet in the lyrics. The last song that she sang was my favorite song. It was very beautiful, and it was a slow song that had a light and flowing. When I first heard the chords in the piano, it had sounded like music that originated in Asia. After the song ended there was a brief pause of silence and it really added to the experience of the song. After the recital ended, I had found out that the last song was written by the singer’s mother just for this recital. Her mother is from Korea and has been a composer for almost all of her life.

 

Questions: One question that I really thought about especially at intermission, was how do singers go about selecting their repertoire for concerts and recitals? I felt the songs at this recital went very well together and I am wondering if it just happened to work out very well, or if there was a method to the madness of song selection. Another question I was thinking about all throughout the performance was how do singers learn how to pronounce so many words in different languages without knowing how to speak it? It is quite impressive.